Turtle Breeding, Farming & Trade Business

  • Breed Name: Turtle
  • Scientific name: Testudines
  • Class: Reptilia
  • Order: Testudines; Batsch, 1788
  • Kingdom: Animalia
  • Phylum: Chordata
  • Speed: Leatherback sea turtle: 1.8 – 10 km/h
  • Lifespan: 100+ years
  • Turtles are cold blooded reptiles characterized by a special bony or cartilaginous shell developed from their ribs and acting as a shield
  • Females prefer to lay their eggs in the Sand
  • Most do not have a good hearing-ability
  • The age at which turtles first reproduce varies from only a few years to perhaps as many as 50, with small species typically reaching sexual maturity sooner around 2-3 years of age
  • Egg Laying/ Production. The number of eggs in a single “clutch” is variable both within and between species. Small species typically lay few eggs. Following is their numbers:
    • Only one or two eggs in the Asian black marsh turtle or the pancake tortoise.
    • Leatherback sea turtle, produces fewer eggs (average 50–90 eggs per clutch)
    • Hawksbill (140–160 eggs)
    • Olive ridley (105–110 eggs)
    • Large Aldabran tortoise (60–80 cm [24–32 inches]) lays 12–14 eggs
    • Common snapping turtle (20–35 cm [8–14 inches]) lays 20–30 eggs
    • Suwanee cooter (14–28 cm [5.5–11 inches]) lays 15–20 eggs
    • Generally eggs are laid annually; a few species lay every other year, and some lay twice in one nesting season. The sea turtles generally nest in 3-4 year cycles, the female usually laying multiple clutches of eggs during each nesting season
  • Feed:
    • Adult turtles typically eat aquatic plants, invertebrates, insects, snails, worms; and occasionally eat dead marine animals.
    • Freshwater species are carnivorous, eating small fish and a wide range of aquatic life.
    • Protein is essential to turtle growth and juvenile turtles are purely carnivorous
  • Lower Classifications. Turtles are divided into two extant suborders: Cryptodira and Pleurodira.
    • Cryptodira is the larger of the two groups and includes all the Sea turtles, the terrestrial tortoises, and many of the freshwater turtles
    • The vast majority of the 350 or so species of turtles and tortoises are “cryptodires,” meaning these reptiles retract their heads straight back into their shells when threatened
    • The rest are “pleurodires,” or side-necked turtles, which fold their necks to one side when retracting their heads
    • Shell of cryptodires are composed of 12 bony plates, while pleurodires have 13, and also have narrower vertebrae in their necks
    • Pleurodire turtles are restricted to the southern hemisphere, including Africa, South America, and Australia.
    • Cryptodires have a worldwide distribution and account for most familiar turtle and tortoise species
    • Famous Aquatic and Terrestrial types of turtles is given below
    • Arrau (Podocnemis expansa)
    • Asian box turtles (family Geomydidae)
    • Blanding’s turtle (Emydoidea blandingii)
    • Chicken turtle (Deirochelys reticularia)
    • Mud turtles and musk turtles (family Kinosternidae)
    • North American box turtles (genus Terrapene)
    • Painted turtle (Chrysemys picta)
    • Pitted shell turtle (Carettochelys insculpta)
    • Pond turtles (families Emydidae and Bataguridae; most species aquatic)
    • Sea turtles (families Dermochelyidae and Cheloniidae)
    • Side-necked turtles (familes Chelidae, Pelomedusidae, and Podocnemididae)
    • Snake-necked turtles (family Chelidae)
    • Snapping turtles (family Chelydridae)
    • Softshell turtles (family Trionychidae)
    • Spotted turtle (Clemmys guttata)
    • Terrapin (Malaclemys terrapin)
    • Tortoises (family Testudinae)
    • Wood turtle (Clemmys insculpta)

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